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20121205
20121213
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is enough to get us past the fiscal cliff, turn off these automatic spending cuts and make sure that taxes don't go up. and then they would figure out what to do with the upper bracket. and then there would be a mechanism that would guarantee further action next year. if at all possible, they would disagree next year and there would be some sort of trigger or punishment for their lack of action. that sounds relatively simple, i think, putting it all together could take at least a couple of weeks after they have a deal. there could be some inevitable blocks either by conservatives in the house or in the senate. blowups either byow wha conservatives in the house or in the senate. the details can get pretty political party quickly. there's so much in flux. it all presupposes that the get an agreement. there was a school of thought that they could not get an agreement until tax rates actually go up next year. >> you can follow himat @apandrewtaylor. >> a discussion on the u.s. economy and you pull in the middle class with participants from think tanks, academia and business at 8:30 a.m. easter
. host: a republican from missouri said, as washington debates the fiscal cliff on spending and taxes we should not forget the regulatory avalanche that awaits businesses in the new year. roughly 4,100 regulations are coming through the pipeline. not all regulations will affect small businesses, many will, however, and the compliance costs for small firms exceed that of their large competition by some 36%. guest: that -- it's difficult for a small business leader to come to the white house and talk about this. we try to put business leaders together to talk about those. on the regulatory front, the head of -- former hofede the office of regulatory affairs who recently left the white house were very aggressive about going out and meeting business leaders and looking for a new way to take input. cat's published results which -- before he left the white house which showed the rate of regulatory activity had drop and the value created by eliminating bad regulations or needless regulations and streamlining regulations had gone up when compared to the previous two administrations. guest: we're
we, on the question of resolving the immediate fiscal cliff. how would you describe your temperature, your feeling that there will be some kind of accommodation and a deal even on the tax and spending and sequester side or both? >> good morning. glad to be with you and give you my perspective on where we are. to the beginning of your question, i often say one i am giving remarks that -- people in the same group, no matter how ponce and they are, people -- no matter how partis and they are, people will say two things. i want you to go to washington and stand on your principal. i want you to fight for us. i say, i will. someone else will get up and say, i want you to compromise and find the middle ground and get things done. this is the 10th time this just happen to me. i say, that is exactly what they hired me to do, to figure out how we do both of those things. it is our job as representatives in congress, to fight for our values and the principles we believe in and still can something done. that is where we are right now. the divide we are facing right now -- i hope all parties unde
what happens if we go off this fiscal cliff. it's a spending decision and a tax decision, but i list them both up here. this chart comes from the congressional research service. a couple interesting things i want to point out here. first and foremost, if we do nothing, tax increases of about $400 billion, there are going to be spending reductions of about $102 billion, there are some other changes that happen at the end of the year that aren't associated with policy decisions, at the end of the day we change the scope of our deficit by about $607 billion. if we do nothing, that's what makes this such a hard issue to grapple with, mr. speaker, if we do nothing, if we reach no agreement, changes that happen automatically and burden us all in different ways, will create $607 billion for the u.s. treasury that we didn't have before. and that's only half of the annual deficit. you see all the pan damone yum that -- pandemonium folks are describing, all the frightful words used to describe the fiscal cliff, if we roll over that fiscal cliff and all of those bad things come to bear, the tax
and we will have live coverage here on c-span. right now, a discussion on the fiscal cliff and domestic program cuts. host: we have been taking a look at different policy aspects of negotiations. before we get to that, sequestration -- if that happens, we're talking about automatic spending cuts for domestic spending. what is sequestration? guest: they used to talk about the vegematic which was a late night kitchen product that did the cutting for you. under the 2011 budget control act, congress was supposed to have a super committee that would determine about $1.20 trillion in deficit-reduction over 10 years. the backup plan was something that nobody wanted. that was across-the-board cuts of about $500 billion over 10 years ending in domestic spending. and another $500 billion in national security related spending. host: we are talking about a total of $109 billion in cuts. the non-defense part of that makes up about $38 billion. guest: of the mandatory past to do with the program's beneficiaries are committed to receiving by law. host: if this happens, let's begin with what is not on
enrollment next october apparen. up next, we are going to turn our attention to the fiscal cliff with jim doyle and get a business perspective on that. later on, looking at the different aspects of the fiscal cliff talks. a closer look at domestic spending. we will be right back. >> ♪ [video clip] >> give it to him hard. >> he is not safe on that bus. >> i've been on that bus. they are just as good as gold. >> all of us in this country are starting to see people coming out and talking about their experience of this phenomenon that so many of us have experienced in one way or another and have had no words for, other than adolescents, other than growing up. finally people are starting to say, this is not actually ia normal part of growing up. moment where there's a possibility for change. we decided to start the movie out of that feeling that voices were bubbling up to the surface to say this is not something we can accept any more as a normal part of our culture. >> the filmmaker has followed up her award winning film by gathering essays and stories together in "bully." hear more saturda
is obvious to the most casual observer is that this plan is not a balanced. the fiscal cliff involves nearly four dollars of anticipated revenue from higher taxes for every dollar of spending cuts, yet the president wants more revenue and fewer spending cuts. if we fell off the cliff, his plan calls for another round of stimulus spending. you have got to be kidding me. lackshe president's plan is any reform in our entitlement system. the unrestrained growth in entitlement system is driving deficits and driving the debt even higher than the percentage of our gdp. it is estimated to be as high as $128 trillion. even if they confiscate all of the income that excesses $1 million, we cannot pay for the entitlement commitments that the federal government has made. we have made promises to ourselves that we simply cannot keep. without some sensible entitlement reform, our credit rating will be downgraded again. we will become a country that none of us recognize. secondly, fiscal plans failed to achieve their government budget deficit or debt reduction goals. dr. hassett has examined fiscal plans in
. tell me about energy policy and where it fits in with the fiscal cliff. what we will spend money on and how we were tightened our belts. >> the major place it fits is the right policy would create an environment which would produce a lot more revenue. that would help to reduce the debt. the federal government doesn't spend much money on energy. energy research is about $6 billion a year. i would like to see it doubled. this report is a blueprint for independence and i think it is the right blueprint. we are not in a position to be held hostage by anybody. it also focuses on find more and use less. what we can do in the federal government is i think invest in research and getting a 500-mile battery for electric cars and getting solar energy that is 1 kilowatt installed and finding a way to capture carbon from coal plants that can be turned into fuel that is commercially sold. we should look at the model of unconventional gas in terms of how our system and federal research and our system of private properties have produced a situation where we have a massive advantage over europe a
be directed to new spending instead of deficit reduction. the fiscal cliff must be averted to protect our economy for future generations. yesterday, house speaker john boehner asked the president to identify specific cuts he's willing to make for a balanced approach. i hope the president will take immediate action so progress can be made for a bipartisan solution. in conclusion, god bless our troops and we will never forget september 11 and the global war on terrorism. the speaker pro tempore: the time of the gentleman has expired. the chair recognizes the gentleman from new york. >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. mig-ins: mr. speaker, there are many lessons to be learned in the wake of the hurricane that devastated parts of new york and new jersey. one of which is the importance of electronic medical records and health information technology. while many hospitals and medical centers were damaged by the storm, hospitals that employed electronic medical records were able to ensure that vital health info
about something that is on everybody's mind, the fiscal cliff. oh my goodness, the fiscal cliff is now just -- wow, 20 days away. so what are we going to do? some have suggested that we really have to deal with entitlements. and i'm here to agree that we can and we should deal with entitlements. certainly two of those issues, which i really don't think we ought to call entitlements but are fundamental programs here in america for americans, should be dealt with. one that some people want to put on the table really doesn't deal with the deficit at all, and that's social security. so before we even get into this discussion tonight, let's just understand or anybody that cares to take on this issue that in dealing with the fiscal cliff, social security is not the problem. the deficit is not caused by social security. social security has never been and in its present form, will not be part of the deficit issue. it's separate and apart. it is a special program. has its own source of revenue. has its own trust fund and isn't running the deficit at all and has not run a deficit. so let's put s
in the spending so we in washington and finally address the problem. >> as we continue to try to solve the fiscal cliff, the thing we have continued to look at is our economy. today in the whip's office we will have small family-owned businesses in there and talk about ways to protect the family business, continue to grow while at the same time make sure we solve this fiscal cliff. look, each and every day as we walk the halls, you continue to ask the questions. the fiscal cliff. we put the offer on the table and the president now has to engage. the next 72 hours are critical. if he sits back and continues to play politics, that will give going. this is the opportunity for the country to lead and opportunity for the president to lead. >> as these fiscal cliff negotiations and debate continues, i think it's important to remember that washington doesn't have a revenue problem, it has a spending problem. and under this administration, under president obama, we have seen record deficits and a record debt accumulate, and yet he keeps demanding that we raise taxes to pay for more spending. this will on
is that this plan is not a balanced. the fiscal cliff involves nearly four dollars of anticipated revenue from higher taxes for every dollar of spending cuts, yet the president wants more revenue and fewer spending cuts. if we fell off the cliff, his plan calls for another round of stimulus spending. you have got to be kidding me. what the president's plan lacks is any reform in our entitlement system. the unrestrained growth in entitlement system is driving deficits and driving the debt even higher than the percentage of our gdp. it is estimated to be as high as $128 trillion. even if they confiscate all of the income that excesses $1 million, we cannot pay for the entitlement commitments that the federal government has made. we have made promises to ourselves that we simply cannot keep. without some sensible entitlement reform, our credit rating will be downgraded again. we will become a country that none of us recognize. secondly, fiscal plans failed to achieve their government budget deficit or debt reduction goals. dr. hassett has examined fiscal plans in other countries. on average, unsu
. ♪ host: we will spend about two hours this morning on the "washington journal" talking about the fiscal cliff. we want to start off hearing from you on a different topic. what do you think about hillary clinton's future and her running for president in 2016? that is our question this morning on the "washington journal." you can start dialing in now, or you can contact us via social media. you can make a comment on our facebook page. you can also send us an e-mail. from "the hill" newspaper yesterday -- a new poll by abc news and "the washington post." 57% say they support a presidential bid from every clinton in 2016. -- from hillary clinton in 2016. 68% approved of her work as secretary of state. 66% hold a favorable view of clinton after her department has faced criticism over the handling of benghazi and libya. clinton also has heavy support in new york were 54% of registered voters say they would support a presidential bid by her in 2016. that is an "the hill" newspaper. we have lots of facebook comments already on this question. we want to share a couple of those with thieu. jackie
in the fiscal cliff talks? if they do not get the money from unemployment insurance. the jobs do not exist in the private sector to take on, then they spend less. that is bad for the economy. extending the programs would benefits. that is because the money trickles through the system. spent on food, housing, he teen, all of the basic necessities that give us a multiplier effect. host: this is from the national employment law project. who will be affected if the program ends. insurance will be cut off after payments for the week ended december 29. unemployment benefits without access to the euc by the end of the first quarter of 2013. tickets for those numbers a little bit and specifically the guest: there are two fundamental programs part of the extension. the important thing about them, this is what really counts in this, they provide the additional benefits passed the six months the market. additional benefits, they are possibly forced onto other kind of government programs like welfare. that is one important consideration to make. over the course of the year, as many as 10 million ameri
as the fiscal cliff take effect. bloomberg government hosted a discussion this morning with the top democrat on the house budget committee, chris van hollen as well as republican senator bob corker and senator mark warner. at 9:00 eastern, president obama and house spear jaub boehner and spoke about the fiscal cliff today. republicans might be willing to agree to higher tax rates on the wealthy in january. house speaker calling on the obama administration to respond to the republicans' deficit proposal. president obama is at 9:00 eastern followed by speaker boehner. >> this weekend on c-span 3's american history tv, follow harry truman's eldest grandson to japan. >> everybody has their own view what happened and i don't want to argue survival to anyone in japan about the history. we're past that. and my whole purpose for being here is to listen to the living and to do what i can. >> sunday at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span 3. >> the supreme court will look at what was passed in 2008 by a majority of 6-3 i believe and going to say that is precedent. and indiana had a -- >> they decided on the in
the conversation over to the spending cuts and the fiscal cliff negotiations. two questions on that. one is, does that suggest that there is movement, so we're no longer talking about tax cuts or tax increases? and where is the administration, i know you guys have argued back that they have provided details on spending cuts, but are you prepared to offer more? today you have a letter from c.b.o.'s urging that spending cuts, entitlement adjustments and so forth be a multiple, a greater multiple than revenues. is the white house prepared to do more on that front? >> let me take your questions in relative order. first of all, i did hear what the speaker of the house had to say. and i would note that if there is one fact that should not be in dispute it ought to be this, the president, unlike any other party to these negotiations, has put forward detailed spending cuts as well as detailed revenue proposals. it is a simple fact that the president put those forward to the nat so super supercommittee in september of 2011. and that he again in the process of these negotiations put them forward as his pos
some of wednesday's events regarding the fiscal cliff. tax increases and spending cuts that will go into effect unless congress acts. first, a bloomberg government form. in an hour, president obama speaks to ceo's at a business roundtable. followed by a news conference with john boehner. several live events to tell you about tomorrow morning. talking about housing issues and the agency's budget. here on c-span at 10:00 eastern. on c-span two, 9:00 a.m. eastern, a news briefing at the pentagon. also, a senate commerce subcommittee on the impact of hurricane sandy and transportation systems in the northeast, on c-span 3 at 10:30 a.m. eastern. >> we have had these explosions of knowledge in medicine but we have not coordinated care. all of these have some in the cracks that they are as harmful as the disease is treated. you have to ask, are we hurting people overall on a global level that's what are we doing sometimes? now we have got the report saying 30% of everything we do may not be necessary in health care. when we step back, 30% of all the medications we prescribe, the procedures
we had in vietnam surtax applied after military spending was already falling. falling office cliff would mean a recession. i think it could be much worse than cbo implies. 1, the economy is very fragile right now and vulnerable to a secondly, i think it has a horrible psychological impact on the business community and consumers who would totally lose confidence in our ability to govern. i agree with david that what we need right now is a downpayment, making some progress. one that probably involves the tax and spending side. and the pledge to do much more later. the important thing to know about the proposals on the street right now is that you can accept everything in the president's proposal for everything in speaker boehner's proposal and he would not solve the budget problems in the longer run. in my judgment, you need about twice what they have put on the table. i'm very troubled by the fact that we are giving the impression that we can solve this problem without imposing much pain on the middle-class. the president made that very explicit. he promised never to raise taxes on
-called fiscal cliff is more likely if both sides do not try to overreached on spending cuts. "congress and the white house need to agree on a plan for taxes and spending." john boehner and president obama spoke on the phone yesterday, a day after the president offered to reduce his initial demand in higher tax revenue over a decade to $1.4 trillion. speaker boehner countered with another offer. and lawmakers were expressing pessimism that a deal was close leading kevin mccarthy to say, i think it is getting worse and not better. stock futures are higher as investors wait for news on whether the federal reserve will announce a new stimulus plan today. regulators have launched three rounds of quantitative easing since the crisis hit. ben bernanke will be held in news conference and you could hear live right here on c-span radio. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. [video clip] >> the white house was very controversial. l'enfant designed washington city. there was a competition and he submitted the design for a palace. americans were not having a palace. it was not par
that the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. instead of reforming the tax code and cutting spending, the president wants to raise tax rates. but even if the president got the tax rate hike that he wanted, understand that we would continue to see trillion dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. washington has got a spending problem, not a revenue problem. if the president doesn't agree with our proposal, i believe he's got an obligation to families and small businesses to offer a plan of his own, a plan that can pass both chambers of the congress. we're ready and eager to talk to the president about such a plan. >> you did speak with the president earlier this week. can you characterize that call? did he have any kind of count offer and we understand that he is making clear that it's got to be increase rates for the wealthy or no deal. are you willing to give a little bit? >> the phone call was pleasant but was more of the same. the conversations that the staff had yesterday were more of the same. it's time for the presid
and the specific spending cuts specific revenue increases that reduce the deficit and avoid the fiscal cliff. we should not put out the hard decisions with gimmicks or triggers. that is what got us here in the first place. at this time to bite the bullet -- it is time to bite the bullet and make the tough decision. the first thing we should do is immediately and eminently extend the middle class tax cuts. this decisive action will ensure that millions of american families do not see a tax cut. -- a tax hike of $2000 in the next two months. we need a long-term solution. most serious plans recommend about $4 trillion to restore the balance. interest savings revives another $600 billion. brining home our troops from iraq and afganistan brings another $800 billion. this plan will strengthen the economy. it will put us on a stable path forward. it must ramp up over time if we will avoid slowing down the economic recovery. 40% of the long-term growth of federal health programs is due to rising healthcare costs. 40%. 60% is due to americans aging. 10,000 americans turn 65 every day. in fact, each and e
to go up. a lot of americans to not know a lot about the fiscal cliff. the confidence and a market reaction is very different than the spending cuts and tax increases. here is the fundamental point. i could be wrong, it happened once. why find out? it is irresponsible to govern the country this way. the sequester and across the board cut, it is bat policy. everybody knows it is bad policy. we are very close to doing it. i find the whole situation unsatisfying. host: our phone lines are open and you can also send us an e- mail. you work for a number of members of the democratic party. you work for the president. a question that comes up often is why there is a partisan divide. what has changed over the last 20 or 30 years? guest: we only have an hour so we cannot go through all of that. there are a lot of things. there are some extraordinary changes. politics as a con tact sport is a substantial change from when i worked on the hill. they did not agree on anything, but they enjoy each other's company. i have seen with my own eyes republicans and democrats refuse to get on the same e
's not a fiscal cliff. the truth is we have a tax decision coming up and we have a spending decision coming up. truthfully, we need more spending decisions coming up. sequester is a new word that we brought up. the sequester, as you recall, mr. speaker, was the hammer that we put in place way back, one of the first big votes you and i took way back in august of 2011. that was part of an agreement that the president wanted to raise the debt ceiling. there were bills that needed to be paid. the speaker of the house, john boehner, said we're not going to expand america's credit card until we get serious about curbing spending. he said, no, mr. president, i will not raise the limit on america's credit card unless you agree to dollar-for-dollar reductions on the spending side of the ledger so that we're not just making the problem worse, we're creating a pathway to solve the problem altogether. i admire the speaker for that. and the speaker and the president agreed on this proposal. it was called the budget control act of 2011, and what it did was to create a -- a committee here on capitol hill, fi
of a fiscal cliff. we did not arrive there by not paying enough taxes. the federal government spends insane amounts of money and even by reducing us all to serfs, the taxes will not cover the spending. well said. here's jerry from lamar. she said, please stop spending our money. walk away from the table if they're not willing to stop wasting our hard-earned money. reform the entitlements and lower the taxes. nothing else in my opinion is acceptable. do not go back to the clinton era. that administration led use in a recession and do not raise the inheritance tax. and then listen to this, she said, i am from a family of farmers. that will kill our family and many others and make it impossible to keep farms that have been in our family for generations. that is the most unfair tax there is. this country will not survive more blows to small business and the middle class. stop the insanity and stop it soon. and finally from patrigsa in jefferson city, she said, i want to voice my opinion on what's happening in washington right now. politicians have put us in this mess with excessive spending. i
with the fiscal cliff? would you be ok if we went over it? caller: i would not be happy about it, but yes. what is the answer, raise more taxes? they will just spend it. it will not spend it to knock down the debt. they would just say, more money for us to spend. what is the point? until they come to the table ready to slow down spending and cut out entire agencies. we are a in big 8 -- we are in big trouble. a tweet -- i want to go now to the democratic line, dorothy is waiting from marble falls, texas. caller: good morning. i think they are missing the boat. what i suggest need happen is, it needs to be solved after an immigration level. most countries do have to put up some kind of bank account to bring your family across the border. if we had a family of four trying to sustain a citizenship here, they should go put up some money in the bank account for a couple of years. as long as there are no other children being born, they do not get host: penalized will this solve the fiscal cliff issue we are facing? caller: yes, if you have money in the bank for every family of for wanting to cross th
not have a deal, your taxes are going to go up. a lot of americans to not know a lot about the fiscal cliff. the confidence and a market reaction is very different than the spending cuts and tax increases. here is the fundamental point. i could be wrong, it happened once. why find out? it is irresponsible to govern the country this way. the sequester and across the board cut, it is bat policy. everybody knows it is bad policy. we are very close to doing it. i find the whole situation unsatisfying. host: our phone lines are open and you can also send us an e- mail. you work for a number of members of the democratic party. you work for the president. a question that comes up often is why there is a partisan divide. what has changed over the last 20 or 30 years? guest: we only have an hour so we cannot go through all of that. there are a lot of things. there are some extraordinary changes. politics as a con tact sport is a substantial change from when i worked on the hill. they did not agree on anything, but they enjoy each other's company. i have seen with my own eyes republicans and democrat
to the edge of the fiscal cliff. instead of reforming the tax code and cutting spending, the president wants to raise tax rates. even if the president got the tax rate hike he wanted, understand we will continue to see $1 trillion deficits for as far as the eye can see. washington has got a spending problem, not a revenue problem. if the president does not agree with our proposal, we believe he has got an obligation to families and small businesses to offer a plan of his own, a plan that can pass both chambers of the congress. we are ready and eager to talk to the president about such a plan. >> you spoke with the president this week. how do you characterize that call? also, we understand that he is making clear that it will have to be increasing rates for the wealthy or no deal. are you willing to give a little bit, if not all of the way to 39.6? >> it was pleasant, but it was more of the same. just more of the same. it is time for the president, if he is serious, to come back. >> they indicated unemployment is down from this time last year. no deal is going to happen, that could hurt ameri
of three months. what we need to be more focused on is to get through the fiscal cliff and get a deal done and lay the foundation for long-term fiscal reform. it is focused primarily on health care. >> senator, can you wait in on this? cbo, 10-year window, this is a requirement. congress needs to address these things. a roadmap, if you will. should we change the rules before we play the game? >> all of these extraordinary and practical ideas cannot survive in the cbo structure. that is a forcing mechanism. people are grasping onto ideas such as changing the age. people can easily explain it i and understand it instead of doing the more complex and difficult things that would get you where you want to go. i would be interested -- i have always opposed -- >> i did not hear that. >> directive scoring when it comes to cbo. i do think somehow and i think this is the governor's point, which is congress ignores a lot of stuff that makes sense. it gets wrapped up in its day- to-day activities. i honestly think you break out of this is if you get a white house and leadership in congress that are wi
a fallback plan for the so called "fiscal cliff", which includes extending tax cuts for the middle class and resuming a fight over spending and taxes for the wealthy later. meanwhile, going overseas, nato makes a move on the turkish border with syria. military officials deny preparations for military intervention. protesters in egypt march on the palace as mohamed morsi flees. international and domestic news is all on the table for you this morning as we open up the phone lines. also, send us a tweet. or post your comment on facebook. or send us an e-mail. we will get back to that new york times story. first, some other headlines on the domestic front. here is the "washington times." also, sticking with the senate, the baltimore sun reporting this headline -- in politics, here is the denver post -- open phones before the first 30 minutes. we have a short show because the house is coming in at 9:00. steve in gaithersburg, maryland, a republican caller. caller: host: when did the republican party become the party that restricts poor? i understand the tax cut for the rich is important to so
about whether we will resolve the fiscal cliff and have some large down payment. when it comes to republicans and conservatives, there are three things to bearer in mind. one is the house republicans they were elected to cut spending and not raise taxes. that is one of the reasons it is hard to move toward. there are a number of revenues that would be acceptable to conservatives. the first one is one that speaker boehner put out almost immediately after the election. that is revenues to a stronger economy. that seems to be acceptable. also acceptable would be a way to reduce subsidies. you could see more premiums for things like flood insurance, pension plans and so forth. these are acceptable type of revenues to conservatives that are not getting a lot of discussions. also are forms of privatizing. we talked about public-private partnerships in transportation, and for structure. also all kinds of ways we can undertake a program of privatizing, involving asset sales and other services to generate revenues to the federal government that would be absolutely acceptable to conserva
of problems in this country and that's why the fiscal cliff, this thing is not the result of taxes, it's as a result of spending and too many people not having jobs to be able to pay in not just their taxes but to be able to sustain our economy. and so we have millions of people that are unemployed and drawing unemployment compensation. we are seeing disabilities rise at a rate of 16% every year. one thing which we note that just before president obama took effect, white house figures show the federal budget was $2.9 trillion. next year's estimate is going to be $3.8 trillion. this is a 31% increase in spending in just four years. we have someone as the president, our great president, who is hung up on taxing and spending. what we need is a house of representatives that's hung up on jobs and job creation. the american product. entrepreneurship. creativity. competition with the world. the next new great ideas. not that will come from this body but from the creativity of the american people. this is what republicans are trying to keep alive in our country. the idea of self-reliance and w
more conducive to an expansion of trade within europe. >> if the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff, will it hit the u.k. into a triple dip recession? >> we have great confidence that one way or another -- [laughter] one way or another, the united states will find a way, if not of the voting going over the cliff, at least hanging by the a banker tips. i have always been impressed by the energy position did with this country. i'm confident in the end you will find a way of doing it. i'm never so sure -- >> even the eye is on the horizon or the fetus on the ground. i take your answer confidently. i want to ask about the libor scandals. in the wake of the alleged manipulation of libor, how difficult will it be built to design and regulate it replacement? >> there are two steps in the replacement, the modification of laboratory the first is to make sure there are some rules and regulations around the way in which reporting banks to submit their quotes and the rates they calai -- claim to be relevant to their ability to borrow. it means the market will for the first time be a regulated a
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